Posted in Entertainment, Music, Theater

Top Ten Favorite Hamilton Songs

EXPLICIT CONTENT WARNING

No joke, I have several MONTHS-old drafts of this same post, but none of them ever felt right. Continue reading “Top Ten Favorite Hamilton Songs”

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Posted in Books

Christmas Cuisine Book Tag

I found an older post on Beth’s blog chock-full of foods I’ve never heard of.

The idea of a Christmas feast scares me (carrot casserole!?), but I couldn’t resist the tag.

Happy Christmas, Harry.

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Continue reading “Christmas Cuisine Book Tag”

Posted in Movies, Theater

R.I.P. It or Ship It Round 2

For round 2, I picked:

Aaron Burr from Hamilton
and
Kylo Ren from Star Wars

Background
Most know Aaron Burr as the man who shot Alexander Hamilton. In the musical, his personality boils down to strategic passivity and resentment at playing second fiddle to the brash, inelegant Hamilton.

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Kylo Ren, the new trilogy’s polarizing villain, idolizes Darth Vader (like many Star Wars fans his age.) Vader possessed the presence, power, and certainty Ren lacks. Ren spends most of his time throwing tantrums and holding grudges. He also enjoys pointless one-on-one duels and failing to blow things up.

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The Couple
Both of these men can hold a grudge; I can see them spending many a night bemoaning their past wounds over pints of Sam Adams.

Both have wrestled with uncertainty and indecision before landing on a single course of action: attain power, no matter the cost.

Kylo Ren isn’t…the smartest of villains. His tendency to rush into situations guided by emotions leads to grand failures for the First Order.

Burr, on the other hand, has the patience to play the long game as well as the drive to take action.

Ren needs Burr standing in Hux’s usual spot at his shoulder, whispering, “Wait for it…”

Verdict: SHIP IT

Posted in Music, Theater

MAKE-YOU-CRY MONDAY: The Ballad of Booth

Sondheim, Sondheim, Sondheim.

Astonishingly bitter and wickedly funny. Better flow and rhymes than most mainstream rappers.

Yeah, I said it.

I became a Sondheim fan after stumbling across “Company” on Netflix a couple years ago. The only downside to liking Sondheim is he’s not what you would call an optimist.

I’ve never seen “Assassins”, but I’ve listened to its soundtrack many times. It’s a bummer. I’ll be the last to argue that America is perfect, but coming out of a musical with a takeaway message of, “America is broken and can’t be fixed?” I’ll take “Memphis” with a side of “Sweeney Todd” instead, please.

“The Ballad of Booth” is one of my favorite songs from “Assassins,” offering both a biography of John Wilkes Booth and speculation about his motives. Booth himself joins in and pleads his case.

It’s obvious from this song that Booth and the rest of the assassins are nuts, yet they remain convinced they’re doing the right thing by killing the president. In Booth’s case, he thinks he saved the country and will be vindicated by history, when in fact his actions had the opposite effect. There’s something depressing about this misguided optimism–it makes his wrongful actions seem even more pointless.

There’s a line in this song that floored me when I first heard it. The mullet-tastic Balladeer sings of Booth:
But traitors just get jeers and boos/Not visits to their graves/While Lincoln, who got mixed reviews/because of you, John, now gets only raves.

WHOA.

This song might not bring on all-out sobs, but you’re not going to feel good after you listen to it. You’re welcome.

Need cheering up?
Not all of Sondheim’s stuff is depressing.

Bonus: this is the perfect song to put on your angsty “No one loves me” playlist. (No judgment. I wouldn’t say that if I didn’t have one.)